Tecomate Wildlife Systems
Shop Tecomate

Search Tecomate.com


Advanced Search

Follow Us On:

Tecomate on Facebook Tecomate on Twitter Tecomate on Instagram Tecomate on YouTube Tecomate on LinkedIn


Blogs, Resources & Articles

Most recent entries

Join our Mailing List

Free Tecomate Email Newsletter Sign-up

Whitetail Wisdom

Whitetail Wisdom articles and tips from some of the finest Whitetail authorities in the country.

Monday, March 12, 2012
Deer Stocking and the TTT Program - Part I

Deer Stocking History
Around 1900, the white-tailed deer population in the U.S. reached an all-time low at less than 500,000 animals.  In fact, deer were essentially extinct in many states and existed only in very remote areas of other states.  As a result, most states closed the hunting season.  Deer populations however, were slow to rebuild on their own. 

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 03/12 at 11:06 PM
Whitetail Wisdom • (0) CommentsPermalink

Monday, February 27, 2012
High Fences: Compliment or Curse? - Part II
Photo by Hardy Jackson
Photo By Hardy Jackson

In the Part I, I discussed the advantages and disadvantages of high fencing your property for management purposes. In Part II, I will examine the negative effects of building your high fence against existing low fence and deer population explosion.

Don’t Build Against Existing Low Fence!
During the middle of my Ph.D. research project examining the movements of 125 radio-collared bucks, the landowner had a new high fence constructed along two boundaries of my study area.  This new high fence was built 18 inches from the existing net-wire low fence.  As a result, I was able to witness firsthand how this new high fence affected deer movements on the two properties.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 02/27 at 11:04 PM
Whitetail Wisdom • (0) CommentsPermalink

Monday, February 20, 2012
High Fences: Compliment or Curse? - Part I

High Fence History
The construction of high fences is definitely on the increase in Texas.  Although high fences are common place today, the history behind the high fence invasion is not well documented.  I was able to piece together a short history of high fencing in Texas after talking with several deer biologists and well established fence builders.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 02/20 at 11:01 PM
Whitetail Wisdom • (0) CommentsPermalink

Monday, February 13, 2012
Solving the Buck Movement Mystery - Part IV

Yearling Bucks versus Mature Bucks
In the previous article I discussed Dr. Stephen Webb’s study on how water availability and protein feeders affected mature buck movement. Thirteen of these mature bucks that Webb tracked were originally captured and radio collared as yearling bucks in 1998.  Evan McCoy, a Masters student at Texas A&M University-Kingsville, tracked these yearling bucks to determine dispersal rates and distances.  As yearlings, these 13 bucks had home ranges that averaged 1,028 acres with core areas that averaged 249 acres.  We then recaptured these same bucks in 2002 when they were five years old.  Webb determined their average home range at maturity to be 450 acres.  Core areas averaged 55 acres.  As a result, home range size decreased an average of 56 percent and core area decreased 78 percent.  These data support the results of my earlier Ph.D. study that showed that home range size and core areas tend to decrease as bucks increase in age.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 02/13 at 02:24 AM
Whitetail Wisdom Big Buck Hunting Permalink

Monday, February 06, 2012
Solving the Buck Movement Mystery - Part III
Photo by Hardy Jackson
Photo By Hardy Jackson

Buck Movements and a New High Fence
Midway through my Ph.D. research, the landowner replaced several miles of perimeter low fence with a brand new 8-foot high fence.  This new high fence was on the eastern and southern boundaries of my study area.  Therefore, several bucks we were tracking had established home ranges that included both sides of this property boundary.  When the new high fence was constructed, we had a very unique opportunity to measure how this new fence would affect buck movements.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 02/06 at 02:22 AM
Whitetail Wisdom Big Buck Hunting Permalink

Monday, January 30, 2012
Solving the Buck Movement Mystery - Part II
Photo by Hardy Jackson
Photo By Hardy Jackson

Seasonal Home Range
The bucks in our study had the smallest home range during spring, which we defined as April 1st through May 31st.  At this time, average home range size was only 694 acres, an amount half as big as the other seasons.  The next smallest seasonal home range was during summer (June 1st through September 30th) at 1,154 acres.  Surprisingly, home ranges were largest during the prerut period (October 1st through November 31st) at 1,292 acres.  Average home range size during the rut (December 1st through January 10th) was 1,236 acres.  During post-rut (January 11th through March 31st), average home range size was 1,273 acres.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 01/30 at 02:20 AM
Whitetail Wisdom Big Buck Hunting Permalink

Monday, January 23, 2012
Solving the Buck Movement Mystery - Part I
Photo by Hardy Jackson
Photo By Hardy Jackson

Hunters have likely debated the factors influencing buck movement patterns ever since Native Americans first began chasing white-tailed deer more than 10,000 years ago.  In the late 1950’s our knowledge regarding whitetail movements took a giant leap forward when the radio-transmitting collar was invented.  Dr. Larry Marchinton was likely the first person to put one of these new radio collars on deer in the early 1960’s in Florida. 

During the decades that followed, literally tens of thousands of whitetails have been captured and fitted with radio collars.  Researchers and DNR staff from nearly every state inhabited by whitetails have tracked the movements of radio-collared deer at one time or another.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 01/23 at 02:17 AM
Whitetail Wisdom Big Buck Hunting Permalink

Monday, November 14, 2011
Deer Behavior: Buck Dispersal

Buck dispersal is not only an interesting deer behavior; it can have a huge impact on the success or failure of your deer management program.  Buck dispersal is defined as the permanent abandonment of a buck’s initial, natal home range for a new home range that is geographically separate.

Deer management effectiveness cannot be maximized without knowing the dispersal behavior of the deer in your area.  Buck dispersal also affects the scale of management.  Dispersal is the longest movement any deer will make in its lifetime therefore is an important contributor to gene flow across the landscape and can impact the spread of disease.  As a result, it is important to know the dispersal rates for your deer herd.

{read more}

Posted by Dr. Mickey W. Hellickson on 11/14 at 02:13 AM
Whitetail WisdomPermalink

Page 2 of 4 pages  <  1 2 3 4 >


© Copyright 2006- Tecomate® Wildlife Systems, LLC - Privacy Policy
Website Design & Development by Cedar Hills Media & Marketing